What makes a city great for bikes? And teensy red frogs can't jump.
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Could You Dig Up Some of Your Driveway?
Could You Dig Up Some of Your Driveway?
Elizabeth is truly pushing the envelope these days, recently telling us to load up our roofs with dirt, and now writing that we should think about getting rid of our driveways and turning them into gardens. Years ago we covered what happened when artist Franke James did that in Toronto: The city came after her and told her it was illegal, that all the parking area must be maintained, and that it had to be covered in asphalt, concrete, or interlock. After a noisy campaign that included Treehugger, she got to keep her garden. But once again we advise, before you tear out your driveway, check with a planning professional.
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Building a Sustainable Condo Today Involves Designing for the Future
Building a Sustainable Condo Today Involves Designing for the Future
Years ago, I built what I thought were sustainable condos. I would do it differently today.
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Is Worcestershire Sauce Vegan?
Is Worcestershire Sauce Vegan? The Vegan's Guide to Worcestershire Sauce
We mostly cover the newsy side of Treehugger in the newsletter, but this series is getting really interesting. It's got anchovies!
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City Ratings for Biking Tells Us How to Improve Our Cities
City Ratings for Biking Tells Us How to Improve Our Cities
Provincetown wins overall, but Montreal wins the big cities.
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These Frogs Are So Small, They Lose Their Balance
These Frogs Are So Small, They Lose Their Balance
Little red pumpkin toadlets can't jump, because just like humans, their balance is all in their ears. Professor Richard Essner tells Mary Jo: “Specifically, the semicircular canals of the inner ear provide key information about rotational movements to a jumping frog which allows it to control its posture in mid-air in order to prepare for landing,” Essner explains. “It turns out that they don't work very well when they get too small.”
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This newsletter has been curated and edited by Lloyd Alter. We’d love to hear from you at lalter@dotdash.com. Thanks for reading.
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