Let's look at some pretty houses instead. And basking sharks.
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Global Carbon Emissions in 2021 Were the Highest in History
Global Carbon Emissions in 2021 Were the Highest in History
I should have started this newsletter with a pretty wooden house on stilts or maybe the steel tiny cabin that Kimberley writes about—I like the light fun stuff first thing in the morning. Who wants to read that all the carbon reductions that happened in 2020, that were going to be a model for how we build back better, went poof? The 2021 calendar year turned out to have had the most carbon emissions in history. And I dread to think of how 2022 is going to turn out, now that we are shoveling coal as fast as we can. I want to climb into that Australian steel tent and go back to sleep!
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Cabin Opens to Embrace Air and Sun
'Permanent Camping' Cabin Opens to Embrace Air and Sun
This really does look like the place to be right now.
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Ecological House Built on Stilts
'Place To Be' Is an Ecological House Built on Stilts
This isn't bad either. Even though it's in Austria, it doesn't burn any gas.
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What Is the Environmental Impact of Going Vegan?
What Is the Environmental Impact of Going Vegan?
"In a perfect world, we would all go vegan." Alas, it's really hard. But Gia says you don't have to go whole hog!
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Emissions From Diet Could Eat Up the Entire 1.5-Degree Carbon Budget
Emissions From Diet Could Eat Up the Entire 1.5-Degree Carbon Budget
According to this post from the archives, to stay under 1.5 degrees Celsius, we don't have much of a choice.
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Great Decline in Basking Shark Sightings in California
There's Been a Great Decline in Basking Shark Sightings in California
They are apparently basking somewhere else. They may have gone up to Canada, where they used to be considered a pest. We don't know much about them. According to study author Alexandra McInturf, “Basking sharks can be fickle creatures! They tend to arrive in coastal ‘hotspots,’ or gathering areas, and sometimes in big groups. But, they don’t do this every year, and the numbers that do show up can be variable. In general, their presence can be hard to predict, especially as sightings have declined.”
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This newsletter has been curated and edited by Lloyd Alter. We’d love to hear from you at lalter@dotdash.com. Thanks for reading.
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